Chicken with Salmonella can make you sick. So can romaine lettuce with E. coli and buffets with lurking norovirus. So why aren’t health officials warning people about eating food contaminated with the new coronavirus?

The answer has to do with the varying paths organisms take to make people sick.

Respiratory viruses like the new coronavirus

The Food Safety Information Council today released information about coronaviruses, COVID-19 and food safety.

Cathy Moir, Council Chair, said that consumers have been in contact asking questions about food safety during the pandemic.

“The good news is that Food Standards Australia New Zealand states that there is no international evidence so far that the virus

A food safety expert released an informative YouTube video (that you can watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=snnpNx6gRIY&utm_source=guelphtoday.com&utm_campaign=guelphtoday.com&utm_medium=referral) to correct inaccurate information that has been circulating about proper protocol when buying groceries and taking them home.

Generally, the same cleanliness rules apply that food safety experts would recommend for common foodborne pathogens like Salmonella, E. coli, and

Dr. Glatter weighs in on a possible sign of a COVID-19 infection that might be overlooked.

While we are focused on cough and fever as the initial signs of COVID-19, it’s also important to be aware that abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea could precede respiratory symptoms in some people.

Results of a new study published